The Problem of Pressure Injuries

It is far, far more advantageous to the patient, nurse, physician, and health care organization to prevent rather than treat hospital-acquired pressure injuries. Treating pressure injuries involves reducing pressure on the affected skin, caring for wounds, controlling pain, treating infection, and maintaining good nutrition, all of which is resource-intensive in time, money, and effort, not to mention the multiple untoward effects suffered by the patient.

A Few Sobering Statistics

Number of people affected:

2.5 million individuals per year. Older adults and people who live in nursing homes are especially vulnerable.

Death:

About 60,000 individuals die as a direct result of pressure injuries each year.

Cost:

Pressure injuries cost $9.1 billion to $11.9 billion per year in the United States. The cost of individual patient care ranges from $20,900 to $151,700 per pressure injury.

Lifestyle:

Pressure injuries may be associated with severe pain, as well as reduced independence, embarrassment, increased hospital stay, and a decreased quality of life.

HAP is dedicated to working with Pennsylvania hospitals to decrease the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure injuries. Through the use of evidence-based protocols, targeted education, technical assistance, and the development of individual action plans for rapid improvement, hospitals have the opportunity to participate in this time-tested collaborative program.

HAP Contacts

For further information on the HAP HIIN Pressure Injury Prevention Project, please contact project manager Janette Bisbee, MSN, RN-BC, CPXP, NHA. Media inquiries should be directed to Liam Migdail, director, media relations.

HAP News

September 29, 2022

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