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News Release: New Report: PA Hospitals Decrease Mortality, Readmissions

November 15, 2018

Pennsylvania’s hospitals continue to make strides in improving the quality and outcomes of the care they deliver to patients across the commonwealth, according to a report released today by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4).

PHC4’s Hospital Performance report for federal fiscal year (FFY) 2017 measures adult readmission and mortality data for the period between October 1, 2016 and September 30, 2017. The report’s five-year comparative analysis (FFY 2012–2017) shows that Pennsylvania’s hospitals are making substantial and statistically significant improvements in mortality for key measures, including respiratory failure, sepsis, heart attack (medical management), pneumonia (aspiration), kidney failure (acute), stroke, pneumonia (acute), colorectal procedures, and heart failure.

Pennsylvania’s hospitals also are improving 30-day readmission rates for heart attack (medical management), respiratory failure, sepsis, kidney failure (acute), pneumonia (aspiration), pneumonia (infectious), stroke, colorectal procedures, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney and urinary tract infections, and abnormal heartbeat. All of these improvements were statistically significant.

None of the other measured conditions demonstrated statistically significant increases in mortality or readmission.

“The report’s findings reinforce the hospital community’s dedication to providing sustaining and meaningful improvements for patients and families,” said Michael J. Consuelos, MD, HAP’s senior vice president, clinical integration.

Consuelos said that, through HAP’s Hospital Improvement Innovation Network (HIIN), hospitals are working together to share best practices and improve patient safety and outcomes. HAP’s HIIN is part of is a patient safety improvement effort under the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Partnership for Patients Initiative, which awarded $347 million to 16 national, regional, or state hospital associations, quality improvement organizations, and health system organizations to reduce hospital-acquired conditions and readmissions.

HAP was selected as one of the 16 organizations nationwide to facilitate a HIIN. Its goals include an overall harm reduction of 20 percent and 12 percent reduction in 30-day readmissions.

“HAP and Pennsylvania’s hospitals work tirelessly to bring together project leads, experts, registered nurses, infection preventionists, and data analysts to focus on collaborative improvement initiatives for conditions including but not limited to sepsis/septic shock, readmissions, and antimicrobial stewardship. These results show that we are making great strides in improving the quality of care—and those improvements are saving lives,” Consuelos concluded.

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